Women read job advertisement differently than men

 

Have you ever looked at a job advertisement in terms of that it is percepted differently by men or women? Do you think that there is a difference? In an eye-tracking study by jobware.de it was found out that formulations in job advertisements have a very large influence on whether men or women are more likely to appeal and eventually apply.

Eye-Tracking is the key

Women spend much longer than men fixing the elements, which give an indication of requirements, working hours and qualification options. On average, women looked at job descriptions for 2.34 seconds. Men felt addressed regardless of the requirements. They looked away after 1.17 seconds. Conversely, men with a 1.14 second retention period were significantly more interested in the companies profile than women (0.32 seconds). Women also tended to read the information serially. Men often let their gaze jump between the elements. This allowed them to “discover” more elements than women – at the expense of the average length of stay, which was only 1.12 seconds. After all, women used 1.29 seconds per element.

Women always more self-critical

Certain designations (such as “senior managers”) or requirements (such as “communication skills”) make job advertisements perceive as more male or female. The investigation revealed that men feel attracted to job advertisements, regardless of how they are formulated: “male”, “female” or “neutral”. Women, on the other hand, seem to look much more accurate and are more likely to apply for “female” or “neutral” job postings. Are there demanded typical male characteristics, many women flinch. Women tend to classify each requirement being essential. They were less likely to react with self-confidence at the same qualifications than men. Men tend to overread missing but required skills. Who doesn’t want to exclude women, should formulate the job advertisement carefully. Make it clear which requirements are essential or optional. With the optional requirements, the number of female applicants is increasing.